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The Shoe Alternative

The Shoe Alternative is a company that offers a fresh take on life coaching. Creativity, discussion, and communication play a big role in their brand and in how they approach new clients.

Tess Copeland, Caitlyn Mahoney, and Leyla Bulmer created the branding for this company. The playfulness of the brand is captured through the bright colours and abstract shapes and patterns. It really has an alternative, off-beat look to it, which I think really suits the brand. I absolutely adore this project. Great work!

See more of this project on Behance.

(via jvnk)

anila quayyum agha casts a delicate web of shadows with a single light bulb

laser-cut wood, single light bulb, 6.5′ square cube / cast shadows – 32′x34′
image courtesy of sarah’s throne

see how the recent artprize 2014 winner exercises the architecture of the gallery with shadow and light here.

(via designboom)


Clever Kit-Kat ad from JWT

Clever Kit-Kat ad from JWT

(via jvnk)

i-donline:

image

10 ways to be parisian with caroline de maigret

designersof:

Name: Ryanwell ManiboTumblr: ryanwellmanibo.tumblr.comDescription: Wallpaper: The struggle is real, but worth itLinks: website - http://ryanwellmanibo.tumblr.com/post/99316283362/wallpaper-the-struggle-is-real-but-worth-it

designersof:

Name: Ryanwell Manibo

Tumblr: ryanwellmanibo.tumblr.com

Description: WallpaperThe struggle is real, but worth it

Links: website - http://ryanwellmanibo.tumblr.com/post/99316283362/wallpaper-the-struggle-is-real-but-worth-it

code-collective:

ROBOPuppet - Low-Cost, 3D Printed Miniatures for Controlling Full-Size Robots

"The project website provides a detailed list of instructions on creating your own ROBOPuppet using software like FreeCAD and TinkerCAD, affordable hardware, and a bit of skill.

  1. Download the CAD model for the target robot
  2. Inspect each joint surface to be articulated – use these observations to determine the final size of the puppet
  3. Create a watertight mesh from the CAD model, scaled to the predetermined size.
  4. Using pocket geometries, modify the robot’s mesh to allow the installation of the joint encoder assemblies as well as access for any additional hardware.
  5. Print the puppet
  6. Clean the printed model and trim any overhand, rafts or support structures.
  7. Install joint controller assemblies.
  8. Assemble puppet
  9. Install friction control bolts
  10. Run wiring and hook everything up
  11. Test encoders and assembly.”

~ 3dprint.com

(via code-collective)

You must be brave to dare to tinker with an established brand’s logo. To alter the actual name, not just the logo, requires steely courage. And in the fashion world, you don’t get a more established name or brand than Yves Saint Laurent.

So when it was announced in June 2012 that newly appointed creative director Hedi Slimane was to alter not only the graphic language, but also the actual nomenclature of the house, the tremors of disapproval were felt all the way from Madison Avenue to Avenue Montaigne. When the new logo made its first appearance a month later, the shrieks of disapprobation went up a notch. To drop ‘Yves’ was disrespectful enough, but to replace painter Cassandre’s mythical 1961 YSL logotype altogether was utter lunacy, surely?

But we beg to differ. Why? Primarily because most of these knee-jerk, social media-fuelled reactions were misinformed and ignorant. So we’d like to set the record straight.

By calling the new line Saint Laurent, Slimane has, in fact, shown intelligence and great respect to Mr Yves Saint Laurent. The new logo design gives a reverent nod to the very beginnings of his game-changing, ready-to-wear collection in 1966, adopting a similar appellation to the original ‘Saint Laurent Rive Gauche’, as well as utilising the Helvetica font styles chosen during that revolutionary era.

This smart trick of ‘retro-branding’ returns the ready-to-wear to the spirit of the origins of the line, but marks a new era.

'It made sense today to transpose these principles and recover the original name and typeface,' Slimane explained in a rare interview. 'The name Rive Gauche disappeared in the past then resurfaced several times. It seems intrinsic to the universe of Yves Saint Laurent, without it being useful to refer to it literally today. We thus went to the essential, a name
that is written as it is spoken every day: Saint Laurent, unequivocally.’

This sensitivity and respect for the Parisian house is not at all surprising as Slimane’s early career highlight was at YSL as ready-to-wear director of men’s collections under the stewardship of Mr Laurent himself. Famously, he then went on to revolutionise the male silhouette at Dior Homme before taking a five-year hiatus from fashion design, moving to Los Angeles (where he continues to live and work) to hone his photographic skills and develop as an artist.

It was at the beginning of this fashion sabbatical that Wallpaper* got to know and like Hedi - and why we must disclose a certain positive bias. As one of our first trio of Guest Editors in 2007 (W*103), we experienced and got to understand his philosophies, working methods and to-the-millimetre approach first-hand.

Meetings in New York, London and Paris were always pleasant, productive and illuminating. Slimane came across as a highly intelligent, deeply curious man who knew that in the turbulent world of fashion, total creative control and strong financial support was essential. But Slimane’s interests beyond the narrow confines of fashion were clear, abundant and very refreshing. Music is, of course, a huge influence, but his awareness and passion for typography, architecture and intelligent industrial design (Dieter Rams, in particular) was more of a surprise.

But it was no surprise to us that Slimane’s attention during those first months in the new job would be paid to the often neglected areas of visual communication: ‘Concentrating on the base before approaching the form. The fundamentals, the signs, the language, before the fashion,’ he will tell you.

Old-school graphic design fans will be relieved to hear that the classic YSL has not, of course, been entirely deleted. The new stripped-back and minimal Helvetica will sit perfectly (as it originally did) with the rhythmic charm of Cassandre’s monogram. Yves may be absent, but we feel certain he would approve. 


Read more at http://www.wallpaper.com/fashion/saint-laurent-by-hedi-slimane-wins-wallpapers-best-rebranding-award/6336#hIO3QtbS0Fh5lpPF.99

(Source: thoxt, via banquethall)

So as Halloween nears, you crazy kids are trying to think up some fun ideas for party favors and food, right?

Dangerous Popsicles!

Dangerous Popsicles!

Instructables user, wei wei, shares her design and instructions for  ‘Dangerous Popsicles‘—which she made in a variety of shapes, including spiky cacti and a whole family of different ideas for molds you may or may not dare to try! Using an Instructable that is beginner-friendly, San Francisco-based wei wei shares her process, which is a combination of basic 3D design, 3D printing, and both one-part and two-part mold making techniques, with silicone casting.

wei wei's design

Instructable for Spiky Cactus Popsicles, designed in Rhino.

Wei wei points out that even if you don’t own a 3D printer yourself, you can easily have your model printed at a third-party 3D printing company likeShapeways or Materialise, where you can upload your design and have the mold prototype printed out for you to take to the next step. Wei Wei outsourced her design to an a Stratasys Objet 3d printer. First though, you need your design. Wei wei designed her’s in Rhino, but there are plenty of free 3D modeling tools out there that are available, which offer a lot of opportunity to explore and practice design.

Wei wei points out that the shape of the model is “very symmetrical, with a clear front and back, where the spikes are.” Since this is for a two-part mold, you will need to consider where the parting line is, with this one having a center line between the front and the back. Once that’s done, you’ll need to either use your 3D printer to print out the original, or arrange to have that done for you.

materialsOnce you have the original shape for creating the mold, you’ll need to gather your materials. Make sure everything is in place and your environment is prepared before you start, as you will want to focus on the materials and not be running about looking for the “ingredients.” For more details on all the materials and each step, be sure to click here.

For creating the mold, you’ll need silicone casting materials and tools:

  • Silicone (for this project, wei wei used Sorta Clear 40, which is good for food-safe applications)
  • Mixing tools
  • Mold release
  • Molding clay
  • Vacuum chamber
  • Gloves and protection for work surface

moldFollowing the instructions of wei wei’s Instructable, you will then need to:

  1. Prepare the original for casting.
  2. Embed the registration keys so that the two parts of the mold fit together just right.
  3. Perform silicone mixing and degassing.
  4. Pour the first half of the mold, and then the second.

And last, after cleaning the mold thoroughly and wiping it dry, align the two parts and stick them together, securing the mold with rubber bands. Get ready to cast your popsicles with whichever popsicle recipe you like, put everything in the freezer and wait 24 hours. Wei wei also included information on dealing with air bubbles during the casting process, as well as how she customized a plastic piece to hold the stick in place.

stickWhile the spiky cactus is the perfect design to start with, you can dream up all sorts of shapes and concepts as wei wei did with cacti, terrifying ‘viruses’, and all sorts of unusual, colorful shapes. Now that you’ve made your own mold, you will have hundreds of popsicles to enjoy in the future. This is a clever idea to put a smile on everyone’s lips, along with a cool, sweet treat. It’s also a great way to get an introduction to 3D printing and the casting of molds.

Current thinking is that with the advent of 3D printing and so many creative ideas for molds, one day it will be more normal for consumers to run to their 3D printers than to a store downtown. Making your own popsicle molds definitely falls in line with that concept—and what better time to start trying something so simple and fun than right before Halloween when arts and crafts abound, and “dangerous popsicles” sound perfect for your little ghosts and ghouls to gobble up at a party.

Have you tried making any food-safe 3D-printed molds, or have you made any Instructables of your own? Tell us about your experiences in the 3D printed Dangerous Popsicle forum thread at 3DPB.com.

dan

personalfactory:

Materia 101 = Arduino + Sharebot
"This weekend, Arduino founder Massimo Banzi announced on an Italian television show called ‘Che tempo che fa’, that his company would be entering the 3D printing space via a collaborative effort with Italian 3D printer manufacturer Sharebot. For those who are unaware, Arduino is the most commonly used open source hardware platform. It is used by both amateurs and professionals to create interactive electronic projects. Along with the various electronic boards offered by the platform, there is also a free Arduino software which can be used to program those boards, as well as a thriving and helpful community.

The electronics board will be compatible with Arduino Mega 2560 with open source firmware. The entire printer is open source and is targeted towards collective use, such as in classrooms, maker spaces, and cooperative work environments.

Specs:
Printer Size: 310 x 330 x 350 mm
Printer Weight: 10 kg
Printing Technology: Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF)
Build Volume: 140 x 100 x 100 mm +/- 5mm
X and Y Resolution: 0.06 mm
Z Resolution: 0.0025 mm
Filament Type and Size: 1.75 mm, PLA.
Experimented filaments: Cristal Flex, PLA Thermosense, Thermoplastic Polyuretane (TPU), PET, PLA Sand, PLA Flex
LCD display 20 x 4 with encoder menu”
~ 3dprint.com

personalfactory:

Materia 101 = Arduino + Sharebot

"This weekend, Arduino founder Massimo Banzi announced on an Italian television show called ‘Che tempo che fa’, that his company would be entering the 3D printing space via a collaborative effort with Italian 3D printer manufacturer Sharebot. For those who are unaware, Arduino is the most commonly used open source hardware platform. It is used by both amateurs and professionals to create interactive electronic projects. Along with the various electronic boards offered by the platform, there is also a free Arduino software which can be used to program those boards, as well as a thriving and helpful community.

The electronics board will be compatible with Arduino Mega 2560 with open source firmware. The entire printer is open source and is targeted towards collective use, such as in classrooms, maker spaces, and cooperative work environments.

Specs:

  • Printer Size: 310 x 330 x 350 mm
  • Printer Weight: 10 kg
  • Printing Technology: Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF)
  • Build Volume: 140 x 100 x 100 mm +/- 5mm
  • X and Y Resolution: 0.06 mm
  • Z Resolution: 0.0025 mm
  • Filament Type and Size: 1.75 mm, PLA.
  • Experimented filaments: Cristal Flex, PLA Thermosense, Thermoplastic Polyuretane (TPU), PET, PLA Sand, PLA Flex
  • LCD display 20 x 4 with encoder menu”

~ 3dprint.com

(Source: centrumdruku3d.pl, via code-collective)